What are you supposed to believe when truths and lies are scrambled like eggs?

It’s getting harder by the day to distinguish between scoop and scat.

Not long ago, I saw a headline on a Facebook post that went something like this: Chicago ID card would be valid voter identification for illegal immigrants.

No way. That’s fake.

Like any great Internet hero, I jump on my trusty steed. And by trusty steed, I mean I opened a new browser tab in order to look up the headline on Google. I’m sure going to say something to my friend who posted this, because it’s obviously fake.

But to my mild surprise, I found this actual headline from the Chicago Tribune: Chicago ID card would be valid voter identification.

But to my mild surprise, I found this actual headline from the Chicago Tribune: Chicago ID card would be valid voter identification.

It’s a story from February of this year. OK. So far, nothing unusual. Someone took a headline and spiced it up a bit. Right?

But then, to my utter shock, I read the first paragraph: “Municipal ID cards that Mayor Rahm Emanuel is launching for undocumented immigrants and others will be a valid form of identification for people both registering to vote and voting in Chicago, according to a letter aldermen received Friday.”

What?

That’ll teach me to be arrogant.

I guess I will not correct my friend. That’ll teach me to be so arrogant.

Snopes says it’s fake because the municipal ID does not change state laws that prevent illegal immigrants from voting. OK, but that’s not the point. The phone line from fact to fiction is now a local call, not long distance.

Here is another one: ‘Smallville’ star confesses she sold children to Rothschilds and Clintons.

This one freaks me out because it starts off with a bit of truth. Allison Mack really is named in a federal case that alleges sex trafficking. The story includes actual quotes from official sources and a video from ABC News.

But despite real ingredients, the story is a fraud.

There’s a huge difference between allegations of sex trafficking as compared to a confession of selling children. Those are not the same.

The website that published this fraudulent story is known for taking real stories and then twisting them.

So that one is false, but it required sorting fact from fiction.

So that one is false, but it required sorting fact from fiction.

Here’s another example. A recent headline says: Pope calls for world-wide gun confiscation except for the U.N.

I’m not quite so arrogant this time. But I still open a new browser tab for further investigation.

Here’s the actual quote: “Do we really want peace? Then let’s ban all weapons so we don’t have to live in fear of war.”

He’s got a point, ya know. Had it not been for the fully semi-automatic AR-15, Cain could not have murdered Abel. People don’t just go around using rocks, sticks, bats, knives, broken beer bottles, cast-iron skillets or other random objects to hurt or kill. They only use officially recognized weapons. But I digress.

We find ourselves increasingly in a situation were we don’t know what’s true.

The point is this. We find ourselves increasingly in a situation where we don’t know what’s true. I don’t have a solution other than to urge a higher level of caution.

Every story that seems too crazy to be true might be false or exaggerated. But it might also be true. Have a bevy of trusted sources and maybe even trusted friends. Verify everything, especially if you plan to use the information in public discourse or the basis of voting decisions.

When all else fails, remember this: “If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask of God.”